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July 11, 2018

Minneapolis, Minn. – The feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist was celebrated on Sunday, June 24 by over 100 singers, conductors, chanters, composers, and musicologists participating in this year’s Pan-Orthodox Music Symposium held at the historic St. Mary’s Orthodox Cathedral here.

The four-day event, sponsored by the International Society for Orthodox Church Music (ISOCM), concluded with a hierarchical all-night vigil and divine liturgy celebrated by His Beatitude, Metropolitan Tikhon, primate of the Orthodox Church in America.

“Creativity is found in the councils of the Church, in the defense of icons, and in the development of...

March 13, 2018

February 8, 2018  Reflection    

By Harrison Russin, Ph.D. candidate in Musicology, Duke University;
Dean’s Fellow and Lecturer in Liturgical Music, St. Vladimir’s Seminary

On Saturday, February 10, 2018, at 6:30 p.m., the seminary Chorale will commence its “Orthodox Masterpieces” series by singing Great Vespers in Three Hierarchs Chapel, featuring select compositions by Archpriest Sergei Glagolev. Father Sergei is noted for his pioneering work in introducing English-language musical compositions into Orthodox Christian church services—inspired hymnography with a uniquely American sound. Following the liturgical service...

December 11, 2017

Minneapolis, MN – The International Society for Orthodox Church Music (www.isocm.com) will host, for the second time, a Pan-Orthodox music symposium at St Mary’s Orthodox Cathedral here from Wednesday, June 20 through Sunday, June 24, 2018. Registration for the event is now open. An early-bird, discounted rate will be available through Friday, February 9, 2018.

The event will explore the theme of "Orthodox Liturgical Music: Ancient and Modern Creativity" through presentations and workshops, music reading sessions, rehearsals, and will culminate in a festive hierarchical All-Night Vigil and Divine Liturgy. Organizers hope the theme will i...

Christ is risen!

As we draw closer to the opening of the 2016 Pan-Orthodox Music Symposium, let's take a look back at the 2014 Symposium held on the campus of Northern Kentucky University.

 

Here, in its entirety, is the keynote address presented by Father Sergei Glagolev on June 13, 2014.

 

The noted priest, musician, and composer who comes from a family of musicians and priests, offered his thoughts and observations based on decades of study and practical experience in the life of the church here in America. 

 

As always, Father Sergei informs and delights us with his joy and passion for singing praises to God.

 

 

 

May 6, 2016

A few months ago, a fascinating article was shared via npr.org on Facebook entitled, “When Choirs Sing, Many Hearts Beat as One.” It was an interesting research study done at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden on the heart rates of high school students as they sang together in a choir. The study findings confirmed that choir music has a calming effect on the heart.

 

In one of the responses, Frederica Matthewes-Green commented, “When people sing together, their heartbeats slow down and synchronize almost immediately. It's obvious, but I never thought about it: singing is a form of guided breathing; we inhale and exhale together, and o...

On February 3, 1959, rock and roll musicians Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and J. P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson were killed in a plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa, together with the pilot, Roger Peterson. The event later became known as "The Day the Music Died," after singer-songwriter Don McLean so referred to it in his 1971 song "American Pie".


Thursday April 21, 2016 will likely become known as the day that Prince died. No doubt, in the future a song will be written about him too. The music legend passed away suddenly, unexpectedly, somewhat mysteriously. Minnesotans grieve for one of their own, probably the most famous person to com...

April 7, 2016

Within the body of repertoire we call the “psaltic art” or “Byzantine chant”, there is a sublimely beautiful genre called the kalophonic (literally “beautiful voice”) irmos. Since the genre emerged in its current form between the end of the 16th and the end of the 17th centuries, it has served as the psaltic art’s highest level of musical, artistic, and vocal expression. For 500 years, composers have set sacred texts to long, melismatic, ornamented lines and extremes of range, spinning out musical beauty of amazing complexity.

 

It is an important enough genre that at least one representative example from the genre is required on reperto...

March 15, 2016

On Tuesday, March 15, 2016, Archimandrite Ephrem (Lash) fell asleep in the Lord. Father Ephrem was well-known in the English speaking world for his translation work and desire to provide the church with accurate and prayerful liturgical texts which clearly articulated the beauty of our Orthodox Faith. 

 

John Michael Boyer, one of our presenters at the upcoming 2016 Pan-Orthodox Music Symposium in Minneapolis, MN shares his thoughts in a reflection on the impact Father Ephrem had on John's training and life as a church musician. 

 

May Father Ephrem's memory be eternal!

I thought about calling him yesterday, but it would have been too l...

January 9, 2016

In France, the vast majority of parishes that worship according to the Russian tradition (by which I mean that they follow the Russian expression of the Byzantine rite and use Russian melodies and tones, whether or not the services are in Slavonic or French) belong to the Archdiocese of Russian Orthodox Churches in Western Europe (hereafter referred to as the Exarchate). This sub-jurisdiction, headquartered at the Cathedral of Alexander Nevsky, Rue Daru, Paris, left the Moscow Patriarchate at the height of the Soviet persecution of the mother Church, and found refuge under the protection of the Ecumenical Patriarchate in 1931. The Exarc...

December 17, 2015

As a newborn, I didn’t breathe for my first two weeks.  Perhaps I just didn’t feel like it, I don’t really know the reason.  As a result, I was hooked up to a machine that took all the blood out of my body, oxygenated it, and then put it back in.  Thinking about it now, it’s pretty cool.  It sounds like something out of Star Trek.  It went on for a week or two.  The only real human interaction I had during that time was with my dad.  He would sit next to the contraption I was isolated in and sing to me.  Just sing.  Eventually, I came home from the hospital.  Home was filled with music.  My parents, my dad especially, wou...