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May 6, 2016

A few months ago, a fascinating article was shared via npr.org on Facebook entitled, “When Choirs Sing, Many Hearts Beat as One.” It was an interesting research study done at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden on the heart rates of high school students as they sang together in a choir. The study findings confirmed that choir music has a calming effect on the heart.

 

In one of the responses, Frederica Matthewes-Green commented, “When people sing together, their heartbeats slow down and synchronize almost immediately. It's obvious, but I never thought about it: singing is a form of guided breathing; we inhale and exhale together, and o...

November 17, 2015

If one of the fundamental goals of “reasonable” liturgical worship is the effective
proclamation of the Gospel in spoken and sung words, the effective audible
communication must be the concern of every liturgical musician. Effective audible
communication is dependent 

 

on many factors—among them, voices of good quality, well
developed diction skills, favorable acoustics. But even more basic, the starting point, if
you will, is a good musical setting of the text—one that takes into account

  1. the cognitive meaning and theological content of the text

  2. the grammatical structure if the text

  3. the sound and cadence of the words themsel...

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